Desmond Tutu needs to check in the nearest psychiatric ward

Posted by tmagaisa
tmagaisa
tmagaisa has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 18 January 2012
in General Blogs

Check Desmond Tutu in the nearest mental institution

 

Just finished reading a letter to The Star by former Archbishop Desmond Tutu on his views on Johan Kotze, the man who order the brutal gunpoint rape of his wife after shooting his step son point blank recently.

I am not qualified to comment on Kotze's potential to be rehabilited into society, especially since its way before his trial has even started, but Tutu has already told the nation that this man has potential for sainthood. In a country that is battling all forms of violent crime daily, it is unfortunate that Tutu can compare Kotze with Mary Magdalene and Peter, Jesus' disciple.  To even compare this crime to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is sick, to say the least. The TRC was designed to heal wounds of an oppressive and inhuman political system that took away certain dignity of a certain race by another. It was not a criminal court but a healing process. The TRC gave Tutu publicity and it’s a known fact he loves the camera. Does he want a TRC for Kotze?

How do victims of violent crime feel? Here is man who lambasts the government every time he opens his mouth for not doing enough to curb violent crimes and he is now romanticising an alleged violent murderer? He wants to help Kotze so much that he even becomes blasphemourous to the point of calling Mary Magdalene a prostitute? What proof is there that she was indeed a lady of the night? He is an embrassment to the church.

Since he has become the Knight in Shining Amour for violent criminals, why not take the crusade to all criminals? He can start with Ananias Mathe and go down the ladder. What was the criteria the insane former bishop used to select his favorite criminal? Afriforum should take their beloved pal Tutu to the nearest psychiatric ward for urgent evaluation. Tutu has reached his sell by date

Tags: Untagged

Comments

Jawellnofine
Jawellnofine
Jawellnofine has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Jawellnofine Thursday, 19 January 2012

you do understand that Kotze is still only at the alledged stages of his incarceration i.e. innocent until proven (beyond doubt) guilty.

Although in my opinion, I generally disagree with the politics of the dear ol'e bishop, he is speaking according to the ethos of his beliefs and the commandments of the deity he worships i.e. it is all about forgiveness and seeing the good in people.

tmagaisa
tmagaisa
tmagaisa has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
tmagaisa Thursday, 19 January 2012

I totally agree with the notion that he is "alleged" to have committed the offence so we should presume he is innocent unless he confesses or found guilty by the courts of law. My problem with the apparently senile Tutu is how he decides who should be forgiven and should not in a country with terrible high rates of violent crime. What was the criteria he used to evaluate this fellow before he came to the point that he uses words like "saint" in apparently justifying such a henious act? Did he take into consideration the families of victims affected by this crime? Forgiveness involves of parties involved and affected but Tutu seems not care about the victims and their families in his quest for cheap publicity.

redsaid
redsaid
Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. - Arthur
User is currently offline
redsaid Friday, 20 January 2012

Offering a victim's perspective

11 months ago my brother-in-law was shot and killed right outside his farmhouse in front of my sister and then 7-year old nephew. (My niece, who was 2 at the time, mercifully didn't wake up from the shooting.)

Needless to say, life has irrevocably changed for my sister and her kiddos. Almost one year later, the repercussions of his loss still reverberates through their lives and even my own. Death is hard enough to deal with under the "best" of circumstances. But when your loved one was taken from you in an act of brutality and violence, it adds dimensions to the pain that is difficult to fathom unless you have suffered through it yourself.

I get that everyone has an opinion. I mean, mere hours before my brother-in-law's murder, I myself was researching something farm murder stats in SA, not knowing that someone I love was about to join the ranks of those facts and figures. But as I've said in a blog post some time after the incident: I don't think we should differentiate between farm murders or any other sort of murder in SA. Yes, farmers are targets, sure, but my sister's pain is not any different from the grief felt by women in townships who lose husbands and sons to violence. We all love the same. We all mourn the same... no matter what class, race, creed or gender we belong to. In the same way, violent criminals in South Africa are not just limited to a select race - as the Kotze case has so clearly demonstrated.

Sorry, didn't mean to hog your comments like this, and I think I ventured off-topic a bit. Just wanted to offer the perspective of someone who has been affected by violent crime.

Please login first in order for you to submit comments